Dating app companies don't have any data on how many lasting relationships result from their app's usage, “Swiped” finds

One of the better quotes on this topic comes from Tinder co-founder and CSO Jonathan Badeen, where he essentially compares the act of using Tinder to doing drugs or gambling.

“We have some of these game-like elements, where you almost feel like you're being rewarded,” says Baden. “It kinda works like a slot machine, where you're excited to see who the next person is, or, hopefully, you're excited to see ‘did I get the match?' and get that ‘It's a Match' screen? It's a nice little rush,” he enthuses.

Social media apps, in general, have been more recently called out for similar behaviors – for leveraging psychological loopholes to addict their users in unhealthy ways.

Apple and Google, for example, have just launched screen time controls aimed at giving us a chance at fighting back at the dangerous dark patterns and brain hacks these apps use. (Apple's toolset is only arriving in iOS 12 – which is just now getting to the public.)

Though everyone today seems to know someone who “met on an app,” it's unclear what portion of the user base is actually finding long-term success with those relationships

” But it's disingenuous to herpes online dating France act as if this is something unique to Tinder (et al) and not just, generally, the god-awful state of the tech industry as a whole at present.

The only other worthwhile part to “Swiped” is where the film points out that no one knows if any of these addictive apps actually succeed in helping people find real relationships.

It's odd, as tech companies are usually data hungry beasts. And success rates would seemingly be the exact kind of metric a company claiming to solve issues around relationship-finding would want to track.

It's certainly fair to criticize companies like Tinder and Bumble for bringing these gamification tricks into delicate areas like those where the focus is supposedly on forming real human connections or “finding love

Asked how many people who met on Tinder got married or ended up in committed relationships, Jessica Carbino, a sociologist at Tinder, tells the filmmaker: “we do not have that information available.” She then adds she's “inundated with emails” from Tinder users getting married and having babies.

(She also hilariously defends casual hookups as something that people go to church to pursue, too, so don't blame Tinder for that! I mean, sometimes this film is just comedy gold, I swear.)

Of course, with a user base in the tens of millions, a good handful of happy emails should be expected. It's definitely not evidence that Tinder is any better than the alternative – bars, blind dates, introductions through friends, etc.

The film then drives this particular point home by citing user studies by both Tinder and the more relationship-focused dating app Hinge, which seem indicate that swiped-based dating doesn't work.

“80% of Tinder users are looking for a serious relationship,” says one Tinder survey. The text then fades, and the next statistic, this time from Hinge, appears.

By the end of the film, it's clear you're expected to delete Tinder and all the other dating apps off your phone and get on with your life.

Tinder's swipe culture is the new normal. It's right to hold it accountable in areas it can do better – reporting and abuse, for example – but it's not going away anytime soon.

You see, if you don't know when you're getting the reward – a treat, a match, etc. – you end up playing the game more often, the psychologists explain.